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Sterntaler Spieluhr Large Rudi Raupe 36cm 60217...
26,99 € *
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Spieluhr large Rudi Raupe 6021733 mit Reißverschluß Grö&#223e: 36cmBrahms Wiegenlied... Material:Flausch/Softvelour: 100% PolyesterPopelin/Jersey: 100% Baumwollewaschbar (Spieluhr vorher herausnehmen)NEU mit Etikett Spieluhr mit

Anbieter: Rakuten
Stand: 06.04.2020
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The Pend Principle: Increase Revenue, Build Bra...
9,95 € *
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The PEND Principle" was created by marketing consultant Rudi Tartaglia. Rudi created this process after working with hundreds of clients in a consultancy capacity, who most times struggled with developing strategic process in their business. The "PEND Principle" covers four key strategic principles that businesses can use to grow over the short, medium, and long term. This process takes the guess work out of when and how to grow strategically, and this principle can be applied across any business type, large or small. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Torry Clark. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/edel/002554/bk_edel_002554_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Rudi Wilfer
34,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Rudi Wilfer (14 September 1936 ) is an Austrian pianist and composer who began his large career already as a jazz musician in the year 1959. He is a jazzpianist and teacher at the conservatory in Vienna. Played with Uzzi Förster Band, Fatty George Band, Slide Hampton, Leo Wright & Carmell Jones Quartett, Oliver Nelson Berlin Dream Band, Erich Kleinschuster Sextett, Charly Antolini Band, Friedrich Gulda, Bud Freeman, Lee Harper, Karl Ratzer, Joe Zawinul and partners in Rudi Wilfer Trio. His "St. Michaeler Messe" was performed at the 1st Salzburger Jazz-Herbst was in 1996 in the Salzburg Cathedral. 2001, during his 65th birthday, Rudi Wilfer wrote his "Lungauer Blues Messe", which had its premiere at the same place, also in the course of the Salzburger Jazz-Herbst. His "Requiem for Joe Zawinul" was performed at the Salzburger Jazz-Herbst 2009 in Salzburg, Austria.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Assembly (NiP)
20,90 € *
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In recent years "leaderless" social movements have proliferated around the globe, from North Africa and the Middle East to Europe, the Americas, and East Asia. Some of these movements have led to impressive gains: the toppling of authoritarian leaders, the furthering of progressive policy, and checks on repressive state forces. They have also been, at times, derided by journalists and political analysts as disorganized and ineffectual, or suppressed by disorientedand perplexed police forces and governments who fail to effectively engage them. Activists, too, struggle to harness the potential of these horizontal movements. Why have the movements, which address the needs and desires of so many, not been able to achieve lasting change and create a new, moredemocratic and just society? Some people assume that if only social movements could find new leaders they would return to their earlier glory. Where, they ask, are the new Martin Luther Kings, Rudi Dutschkes, and Stephen Bikos?With the rise of right-wing political parties in many countries, the question of how to organize democratically and effectively has become increasingly urgent. Although today's leaderless political organizations are not sufficient, a return to traditional, centralized forms of political leadership is neither desirable nor possible. Instead, as Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri argue, familiar roles must be reversed: leaders should be responsible for short-term, tactical action, but it is themultitude that must drive strategy. In other words, if these new social movements are to achieve meaningful revolution, they must invent effective modes of assembly and decision-making structures that rely on the broadest democratic base. Drawing on ideas developed through their well-known Empiretrilogy, Hardt and Negri have produced, in Assembly, a timely proposal for how current large-scale horizontal movements can develop the capacities for political strategy and decision-making to effect lasting and democratic change. We have not yet seen what is possible when the multitude assembles.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 06.04.2020
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The Universe Wants to Play
32,90 CHF *
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We chose Hakim Bey's wonderful phrase 'The Universe Wants to Play' as the unifying theme for the articles in this volume, the 12th of The Anomalist journal. Since we began publishing in 1994, this highly praised nonfiction anthology has had as its focus maverick science, unexplained mysteries, unorthodox theories, and strange talents. In this issue. Philosopher Joseph M. Felser argues that it is utterly pointless to attempt to prove the reality of the paranormal scientifically. It seems that proof is part of the problem, not the solution. Journalist Jay Walljasper visits and interviews maverick scientist Rupert Sheldrake. Why does he rub so many biologists and physicists the wrong way? The potential victims you never hear about: Author Michael Schmicker wonders if ESP may not have helped save some people from serial killers. When terrorized, we tend to turn deranged individuals into larger-than-life creations. Authors Hilary Evans and Robert Bartholomew look at London's long history of Monster Scares, both real and imagined. We know that spiritualism was rife with fraud but was there a core kernel of phenomena behind the movement? Journalist Gregory Gutierez examines early attempts to scientifically monitor the famous Austrian medium Rudi Schneider. The indefatigable Nick Redfern spins a cold war tale of psychics, spies, and UFOs. In an effort to gain the upper hand, American and Soviet sleuths went down some strange alleyways. Cryptobotany anyone? David Hricenak takes cryptozoology to task for too often focusing on the large and 'monstrous.' What gets overlooked in the process, both above and below. Almost every culture has it tales of little people. Maybe they weren't so farfetched after all. Biologist Dwight Smith and researcher Gary Mangiacopra document the discovery of, and claims for, a new species of hominid - Homo floresiensis. Why some scientists may have good reason to be timid. Geophysicist Roger Hart details the legacy of the blacklist in the science of extraterrestrial life. Policeman Albert Rosales looks at some of the strangest encounters with UFO 'aliens' ever reported. Some may even embarrass the true believers. Finally, archeologist William Beauchamp presents, in a classic reprint, all the details of a remarkable set of earthworks in upstate New York. Little-known, beautiful, and mysterious.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Hardt, M: Assembly
46,90 CHF *
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Each year a new eruption of 'leaderless' social movements — from North Africa and the Middle East to Europe, the Americas, and East Asia — leaves journalists, political analysts, police forces, and governments disoriented and perplexed. Activists too struggle to understand and evaluate the power and effectiveness of horizontal movements. Why have the movements, which address the needs and desires of so many, not been able to achieve lasting change and create a new, more democratic and just society? Some people assume that if only social movements could find new leaders they would return to their earlier glory. Where, they ask, are the new Martin Luther Kings, Rudi Dutschkes, and Steven Bikos? Although today's leaderless and spontaneous political organizations are not sufficient, a return to traditional, centralized forms of political leadership is neither desirable nor possible. Necessary, instead, as Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri argue, is an inversion of the roles of the multitude and leadership in political organizations. Leaders should be confined to short-term, tactical action, while the multitude drives strategy. In other words, the formulation of long-term goals and objectives must come from the collective, rather than designated figureheads. Drawing on the ideas developed through their well-known Empire trilogy, Hardt and Negri have produced, in Assembly, a timely proposal for how current large-scale, horizontal movements can develop collectively the capacities for political strategy and decision-making to effect lasting and democratic change.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 06.04.2020
Zum Angebot
The Universe Wants to Play
17,99 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

We chose Hakim Bey's wonderful phrase 'The Universe Wants to Play' as the unifying theme for the articles in this volume, the 12th of The Anomalist journal. Since we began publishing in 1994, this highly praised nonfiction anthology has had as its focus maverick science, unexplained mysteries, unorthodox theories, and strange talents. In this issue. Philosopher Joseph M. Felser argues that it is utterly pointless to attempt to prove the reality of the paranormal scientifically. It seems that proof is part of the problem, not the solution. Journalist Jay Walljasper visits and interviews maverick scientist Rupert Sheldrake. Why does he rub so many biologists and physicists the wrong way? The potential victims you never hear about: Author Michael Schmicker wonders if ESP may not have helped save some people from serial killers. When terrorized, we tend to turn deranged individuals into larger-than-life creations. Authors Hilary Evans and Robert Bartholomew look at London's long history of Monster Scares, both real and imagined. We know that spiritualism was rife with fraud but was there a core kernel of phenomena behind the movement? Journalist Gregory Gutierez examines early attempts to scientifically monitor the famous Austrian medium Rudi Schneider. The indefatigable Nick Redfern spins a cold war tale of psychics, spies, and UFOs. In an effort to gain the upper hand, American and Soviet sleuths went down some strange alleyways. Cryptobotany anyone? David Hricenak takes cryptozoology to task for too often focusing on the large and 'monstrous.' What gets overlooked in the process, both above and below. Almost every culture has it tales of little people. Maybe they weren't so farfetched after all. Biologist Dwight Smith and researcher Gary Mangiacopra document the discovery of, and claims for, a new species of hominid - Homo floresiensis. Why some scientists may have good reason to be timid. Geophysicist Roger Hart details the legacy of the blacklist in the science of extraterrestrial life. Policeman Albert Rosales looks at some of the strangest encounters with UFO 'aliens' ever reported. Some may even embarrass the true believers. Finally, archeologist William Beauchamp presents, in a classic reprint, all the details of a remarkable set of earthworks in upstate New York. Little-known, beautiful, and mysterious.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 06.04.2020
Zum Angebot